STEVE MICHELLE WEIGHT LOSS BATTLE

TOWARDS A BETTER LIFE

sucide

How To Help Someone Who's Hurting #Suicide You don’t have to have all the answers or make them happy. Here’s what you can do: 1. Let them lead the conversation. 2. Listen. Really listen. 3. Let them know you’re there for them and want to help. 4. Offer to connect them with any additional support they might need. suicideprevention.wikia.com/wiki/International_Suicide_Preve...

rate of sucide

The rate of suicide is on the rise worldwide in all age categories. It affects all ethnicities, cultures and religions. It is bias-free. It is a last resort, a desperate attempt to quell the never-ending and relentless pain that monopolizes your mind. It has become the only feasible way to rid yourself of the burdensome weight that has dragged you to this level of despair. Give and get support on The Mighty. #CheckInWithMe and The Mighty community here. That is how I’ve felt anyway, the countless number of times I have and do fall into the darkness. And because I can empathize, take a minute to read this letter to you. Dear You. If you are reading this there is a small piece of you that wants to hold on. I am so proud of you for reaching out, even if you have done so without words. You have kindly given me a few minutes of your time, and I do appreciate that. I want you to live. I want you to want to live. I won’t feed you some bullshit like it’s all going to be OK with time because it may not be, and it may not turn out as you wish, but you will never know if you don’t stick around to find out. I will instead tell you I am here with you. Let’s take this a minute at a time. I will remind you that although I don’t know what tomorrow will bring, I will be by your side to find out. You are so important. I won’t make you feel selfish by telling you to stick around for your family or friends, because I know you feel that leaving would not only end your burden, but theirs as well. I will tell you someone loves you despite how you feel inside. I will remind you that you are not and never will be a burden. You may not see or even hear it, but someone out there values your life; I value your life. I don’t know you, but I do care because I can empathize with your pain; I feel it myself. You are incredibly strong. I won’t ever tell you that you are being dramatic and don’t really want to die. I will instead be here to listen and validate your feelings because they are as significant as you are. I am so proud of you for still staying with me. I won’t ever tell you things could be worse or that other people have it worse than you and don’t want to die. I will acknowledge your despair and lack of hope. I will never compare your pain to another’s. It would be like observing two gunshot wounds, one in the chest and one in the leg. Yes, it is worse to get shot in the chest, but it does not take away the pain of being shot in the leg. You are beautiful. I won’t use the old adage “suicide is a permanent solution to a temporary problem.” I will say that your problems might not be temporary, but I will be with you and help you to find a coping mechanism that works for you. I will tell you suicide is simply not a solution. I won’t shove the ideas of therapy or medication down your throat as that will not help at the moment. I will ask some of the most important words of all: How can I help?” I will provide you with a suicide hotline (1-800-273-8255 or text the word “start” to 741-741.) You are a warrior. Your track record of making it through trauma, heartbreak and devastation is 100 percent. Despite the rocks life has thrown at you, you have emerged with scars and grit. You have proven wrong those who expected you not to make it, those who gave up on you long before you gave up on yourself. You are amazing. You have a purpose in this life, whether you realize it at this point or not. Your book has so many chapters to be written. You are needed, your voice and your story are essential for someone, be it a stranger or a friend. You are your own hero. You have done what you think you cannot do. You have looked death in the face, stared it down and walked away having won another battle in your war. If you are still reading this, I am incredibly proud of you for stopping what you were doing and giving me a few moments of your precious time. Just reading this is the beginning… you have extended your arm, you just have to unclench your fist. I implore you to keep this conversation going, be it with a hotline, a friend or family member, or even me (@onelastkick71). You have taken the first step; let’s make it to the second together.

r u ok

Our cast share how they take care of their mental health on R U OK Day. Starting an R U OK conversation? Use these four steps: 1. Ask R U OK? 2. Listen 3. Encourage action 4. Check-in For more tips click here - https://www.ruok.org.au/

How Can I Express That I Feel Anxious

How Can I Express That I Feel Anxious? Expressing to another, either in passing conversation, or on a more serious note, that I am feeling anxious is important. Anxiety is a serious mental illness, which causes feelings of fear, dread and may result in panic attacks, self harm, as well as risky behaviors and even suicide. By expressing how I feel when I experience symptoms of anxiety, I am protecting myself from the worsening of my symptoms and helping heal my relationship with my mental illness. Anxiety is a terribly painful experience for the person experiencing it. No individual can rightfully claim that they desire to suffer from mental illness and anxiety is no different. I have two types of anxious disorders - generalised anxiety disorder and social anxiety disorder. I feel tired and ashamed of admitting to the people around me that I am unwell, and have been for a very long time. Instead of being supported and worked on, I have had to suffer in silence for a number of years, until I was finally able to raise my voice and stand up for myself. I suffer from anxiety. Period. Having said that, this statement creates numerous questions in the minds of people who hear it. They wonder whether it is real. They wonder whether anxiety means that I am a compulsive worrier. They are unsure of how to respond. Anxiety is something which keeps people like me ensnared in a cult of silence; as constant and persistent sufferers of a mental illness that not many people understand, we are struggling to reach out to individuals and feel supported in meaningful ways. I feel tired and ashamed of telling people that I have an anxiety disorder. Two, in fact. I feel that they are judging me for being incapable of seeking treatment (not true, as I am currently getting treated for both), they are judging me for being stupid (not true, anxiety is rooted in a chemical imbalance in the brain, not in IQ), they are judging me for being “crazy” (anxiety is a mental illness, not a cultural stereotype of behavior which isn’t socially accepted). I fear not being able to make friends, find work, or make sure that the various “departments” of my life are able to develop to the degrees that they need to. Anxiety often keeps me from doing the things I want to do and enjoy. I keep telling myself that something bad will happen to me if I enjoy myself too much. That I might become the victim of some kind of crime or hatred. I keep feeling afraid of the people and the environments I spend most of my time inside, thinking that I’m not safe here. Anxiety keeps me from truly feeling comfortable inside my own skin. Within the conversation around anxiety, is a core reality - we don’t talk about anxiety nearly enough for it to be socially accepted and normalised. I want to change that, with you, together. Share 2

helping mind

Dear Stephen, Today saw the Queen’s Speech mark the beginning of a new session of Parliament, and set out the Government’s priorities. We were pleased to see commitments on the Mental Health Act make the speech, with the Queen saying: “Ministers will continue work to reform the Mental Health Act to improve respect for, and care of, those receiving treatment.” It is now almost a year since the Independent Review of the Mental Health Act was published and we now need to see words turn into action. We’ll be pushing for the Government to get moving without any more delay, and we’ll let you know soon how you can be involved. Sophie Corlett our Director of External Relations has said: “The urgency of reviewing the Mental Health Act cannot be overstated. Increasing numbers of people being sectioned under the Act are enduring substandard treatment due to poor conditions, lack of choice, loss of dignity and even racial discrimination. This can’t go on. The Government must urgently publish a White Paper setting out the detail on how it will amend the Act.” We’ll be in touch soon with more on what comes next. Thank you for all that you do Stephen. Take care, Nancy from Mind We're here for you If you have a general query about the organisation, our contact details are: Mind 15-19 Broadway, Stratford, London E15 4BQ T: 020 8519 2122 e: supporterrelations@mind.org.uk ■ For information on mental health please contact our Infoline. ■ Find your nearest local Mind or shop. Follow us Privacy Policy | Unsubscribe If you would like to stop receiving emails like this one, please contact our supporter services team at preferences@mind.org.uk or by calling 0300 999 1946. You can unsubscribe from all Mind emails here. Mind is a registered charity (no.219830) and company in England and Wales (no.424348). Our registered office is at 15-19 Broadway, Stratford, London E15 4BQ.

helping mind charity

Dear Stephen, Today saw the Queen’s Speech mark the beginning of a new session of Parliament, and set out the Government’s priorities. We were pleased to see commitments on the Mental Health Act make the speech, with the Queen saying: “Ministers will continue work to reform the Mental Health Act to improve respect for, and care of, those receiving treatment.” It is now almost a year since the Independent Review of the Mental Health Act was published and we now need to see words turn into action. We’ll be pushing for the Government to get moving without any more delay, and we’ll let you know soon how you can be involved. Sophie Corlett our Director of External Relations has said: “The urgency of reviewing the Mental Health Act cannot be overstated. Increasing numbers of people being sectioned under the Act are enduring substandard treatment due to poor conditions, lack of choice, loss of dignity and even racial discrimination. This can’t go on. The Government must urgently publish a White Paper setting out the detail on how it will amend the Act.” We’ll be in touch soon with more on what comes next. Thank you for all that you do Stephen. Take care, Nancy from Mind We're here for you If you have a general query about the organisation, our contact details are: Mind 15-19 Broadway, Stratford, London E15 4BQ T: 020 8519 2122 e: supporterrelations@mind.org.uk ■ For information on mental health please contact our Infoline. ■ Find your nearest local Mind or shop. Follow us Privacy Policy | Unsubscribe If you would like to stop receiving emails like this one, please contact our supporter services team at preferences@mind.org.uk or by calling 0300 999 1946. You can unsubscribe from all Mind emails here. Mind is a registered charity (no.219830) and company in England and Wales (no.424348). Our registered office is at 15-19 Broadway, Stratford, London E15 4BQ.

mental health

YOU'RE NOT ALONE EVERY 90 minutes in the UK a life is lost to suicide.It doesn't discriminate, touching the lives of people in every corner of society - from the homeless and unemployed to builders and doctors, reality stars and footballers.It's the biggest killer of people under the age of 35, more deadly than cancer and car crashes.And men are three times more likely to take their own life than women.Yet it's rarely spoken of, a taboo that threatens to continue its deadly rampage unless we all stop and take notice, now.That is why The Sun launched the You're Not Alone campaign.The aim is that by sharing practical advice, raising awareness and breaking down the barriers people face when talking about their mental health, we can all do our bit to help save lives.Let's all vow to ask for help when we need it, and listen out for others... You're Not Alone.If you, or anyone you know, needs help dealing with mental health problems, the following organisations provide support: CALM, www.thecalmzone.net, 0800 585 858 Heads Together, www.headstogether.org.uk Mind, www.mind.org.uk, 0300 123 3393 Papyrus, www.papyrus-uk.org, 0800 068 41 41 Samaritans, www.samaritans.org, 116 123

Mental health refers to our cognitive, behavioral, and emotional wellbeing - it is all about how we think, feel, and behave. The term 'mental health' is sometimes used to mean an absence of a mental disorder. Mental health can affect daily life, relationships, and even physical health. Mental health also includes a person's ability to enjoy life - to attain a balance between life activities and efforts to achieve psychological resilience. In this article, we will explain what is meant by the terms "mental health" and "mental illness." We will also describe the most common types of mental disorder and how they are treated. The article will also cover some early signs of mental health problems. Definition Woman with mental health issues Mental health problems can affect anyone at any age. According to Medilexicon's medical dictionary, mental health is: "Emotional, behavioral, and social maturity or normality; the absence of a mental or behavioral disorder; a state of psychological well-being in which one has achieved a satisfactory integration of one's instinctual drives acceptable to both oneself and one's social milieu; an appropriate balance of love, work, and leisure pursuits." According to the WHO (World Health Organization), mental health is: "... a state of well-being in which the individual realizes his or her own abilities, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to his or her community." The WHO stresses that mental health "is not just the absence of mental disorder." Risk factors Experts say we all have the potential to develop mental health problems, no matter how old we are, whether we are male or female, rich or poor, or which ethnic group we belong to. Almost 1 in 5 Americans experiences mental health problems each year (18.5 percent). In the United States, in 2015, an estimated 9.8 million adults (over 18) had a serious mental disorder. That equates to 4.8 percent of all American adults. A large proportion of the people who have a mental disorder have more than one. In the U.S. and much of the developed world, mental disorders are one of the leading causes of disability. Common disorders The most common types of mental illness are anxiety disorders, mood disorders, and schizophrenia disorders; below we explain each in turn: Anxiety disorders Woman with anxiety disorder Anxiety disorders are the most common type of mental illness. Anxiety disorders are the most common types of mental illness. The individual has a severe fear or anxiety, which is linked to certain objects or situations. Most people with an anxiety disorder will try to avoid exposure to whatever triggers their anxiety. Examples of anxiety disorders include: Panic disorder - the person experiences sudden paralyzing terror or a sense of imminent disaster. Phobias - these may include simple phobias (a disproportionate fear of objects), social phobias (fear of being subject to the judgment of others), and agoraphobia (dread of situations where getting away or breaking free may be difficult). We really do not know how many phobias there are - there could be thousands of types. Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) - the person has obsessions and compulsions. In other words, constant stressful thoughts (obsessions), and a powerful urge to perform repetitive acts, such as hand washing (compulsion). Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) - this can occur after somebody has been through a traumatic event - something horrible or frightening that they experienced or witnessed. During this type of event, the person thinks that their life or other people's lives are in danger. They may feel afraid or feel that they have no control over what is happening. Mood disorders These are also known as affective disorders or depressive disorders. Patients with these conditions have significant changes in mood, generally involving either mania (elation) or depression. Examples of mood disorders include: Major depression - the individual is no longer interested in and does not enjoy activities and events that they previously liked. There are extreme or prolonged periods of sadness. Bipolar disorder - previously known as manic-depressive illness, or manic depression. The individual switches from episodes of euphoria (mania) to depression (despair). Persistent depressive disorder - previously known as dysthymia, this is mild chronic (long term) depression. The patient has similar symptoms to major depression but to a lesser extent. SAD (seasonal affective disorder) - a type of major depression that is triggered by lack of daylight. It is most common in countries far from the equator during late autumn, winter, and early spring

 

Major depression - the individual is no longer interested in and does not enjoy activities and events that they previously liked. There are extreme or prolonged periods of sadness. Bipolar disorder - previously known as manic-depressive illness, or manic depression. The individual switches from episodes of euphoria (mania) to depression (despair). Persistent depressive disorder - previously known as dysthymia, this is mild chronic (long term) depression. The patient has similar symptoms to major depression but to a lesser extent. SAD (seasonal affective disorder) - a type of major depression that is triggered by lack of daylight. It is most common in countries far from the equator during late autumn, winter, and early spring.