STEVE MICHELLE WEIGHT LOSS BATTLE

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Children with siblings are less likely to be obese than only-children

Washington D.C , Nov 7 : A new study reveals that families with multiple children tend to make more healthy eating decisions than families with a single child. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, found that only-children, who researchers refer to as 'singletons', had less healthy family eating practices, beverage choices, and total Healthy Eating Index 2010 score, coming in lower on three out of the 12 areas measured. They also had significantly lower total scores across weekdays, weekends, and on average, indicating there are both individual and collective differences in eating patterns between the groups. "Nutrition professionals must consider the influence of family and siblings to provide appropriate and tailored nutrition education for families of young children," said lead author Chelsea L. Kracht, PhD. Dr Kracht completed the research during her PhD program alongside Dr Susan Sisson at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA. "Efforts to help all children and families establish healthy eating habits and practices must be encouraged." Data were self-reported in daily food logs kept by mothers over the course of three days - two weekdays and one weekend day. Teachers kept logs by proxy for any food children ate while at school. Mothers also completed the Family Nutrition and Physical Activity questionnaire to evaluate typical family eating behaviours like food and beverage choice. Researchers found mothers of singleton children were more likely to be obese themselves. Moreover, maternal BMI had a much stronger connection to the child BMI percentile and waist circumference percentile than singleton status. Maternal BMI did not significantly contribute to overall eating patterns but did contribute to empty calories. The study only looked at mothers and children and so could not speak to the impact of fathers' eating patterns, but the results were independent of marital status. The study also found that time spent in away-from-home care like school and daycare was not connected to children's eating patterns. This points to the difference coming from inside the household, including a difference in how frequently the family eats in front of the television (family eating practices score) and sugary drinks consumption (beverage choices score), which differed between groups in the study. "Healthier eating behaviours and patterns may result from household-level changes rather than peer exposure, as peer exposure is also present in away-from-home care," Dr Kracht said. Dr Kracht and her colleagues are continuing their research, looking specifically into a household and family dynamics and how they influence children's eating behaviour, physical activity, sleep, and other factors contributing to obesity. Like This Article? Children with siblings are less likely to be obese than only-children contact Post your comment category Read other Health News stories home page Visit Home Page for latest updates

One in four Blackpool children obese by the time they leave primary school

A quarter of Blackpool children are obese by the time they leave primary school, worrying new figures have revealed. Sugary drinks and junk food are to blame for the resort’s youngsters piling on the pounds, says the Obesity Health Alliance campaign group. NHS data shows that 25 per cent of Year 6 pupils in Blackpool in 2018/19 were obese. This was up on the 16 per cent considered obese in 2006/07, the earliest year with available data. Hello, this is the first of your 5 free articles for this week Subscribe today Additionally, 15 per cent of Year 6 children were overweight last year, higher than 12 per cent in 2006/07. This means 40 per cent of the town’s pupils in the last year of primary school were unhealthily overweight. And six per cent were considered severely obese, with a body mass index (BMI) in the top one-in-250 for children. Nationally, in 2018/19, four per cent of 10 and 11-year-olds were classed as severely obese - a record high for the fourth consecutive year. The obesity rate, which includes severe obesity, was 20 per cent. Caroline Cerny, of the Obesity Health Alliance, said children are growing up in an environment that is ‘flooded’ with unhealthy food and drinks, which are damaging their health. She said: “It’s time for the Government to bring in the measures that we know will stem the tide of unhealthy food marketing and promotions, starting with the long overdue 9pm watershed on junk food adverts on TV and online.” Dr Arif Rajpura, Blackpool Council Director of Public Health, said: “Childhood obesity has been described as one of the most serious Public Health challenges in the 21st Century with obesity disproportionately affecting children living in deprived areas and some ethnic minority groups. “It has been recognised as a complex problem by the UK’s Government with multiple causes. The Government’s ambition is to halve childhood obesity by 2030 in England, and have laid down some important foundations for change with two Chapters of a National childhood obesity plan, a prevention green paper; Advancing our health; prevention in the 2020s, and the NHS Long Term Plan. “Excess weight has slowly crept up on us, and is now accepted as normal. However, it is a matter of health and not how our children look. We hear too often discussions about weight as stigmatising and laying the blame at individuals, but we need to recognise the changes in our living environment which are shaping behaviours, and making it harder for us to make healthy choices. The inabitilty to hear consonants is a symptom of hearing difficulties Seven in 10 Brits believe their partner has ‘selective hearing’ – but men are ‘worse’ than women, according to a study “Physical activity is important but will not solve obesity on its own. As a society we are drowning in a flood of unhealthy food and drink options including super-sized portions which exceed daily calorie intake. Our children are constantly exposed to advertising of unhealthy food and drink and utilised cartoon characters to market these items and make them appear attractive. Healthy food and drink is often perceived as unaffordable, whilst the unhealthy options are cheap. “In January 2016 the council made a commitment to promote healthy weight and improve the health and well-being of the local population by signing a Local Declaration on Healthy Weight.  The aim of the declaration is for the council to demonstrate a commitment to reduce unhealthy weight in the community, protect the health and wellbeing of staff and the local population and to make an economic impact on health and social care of the local economy. The declaration was developed in partnership with Food Active and other Directors of Public Health across the North West of England. “Since the signing of this declaration the Public Health Team have been working in partnership with a range of organisations to drive the healthy weight agenda forward. “As well as our own work, we will continue to lobby the Government to do more to reduce the lure of food and drinks laden with sugar, and to crack down on some of the inappropriate marketing of unhealthy foods that we see everywhere we turn.” Public Health England works out obesity using the 1990 British growth reference chart, a large collection of statistics used to determine a child’s BMI. It defines a child as obese if their BMI is in the chart’s top five per cent, and overweight if they are in the top 15 per cent. NHS chief executive Simon Stevens said obesity is a ‘dangerous public health threat’ for children. “While the NHS will be there for patients, services and budgets will obviously be placed under more strain,” he said. “So we also need combined action from parents, businesses and government to safeguard our children from this preventable harm.” Obesity increases a person’s risk of developing serious and sometimes life-threatening health problems, including heart disease, type 2 diabetes, some types of cancer including breast and bowel cancer, and stroke, according to the NHS. In 2018, the Government announced new measures to half childhood obesity by 2030. These included proposals to prevent parents giving in to temptation by stopping shops from displaying junk food at checkouts.

Experts Support Weight-Loss Surgery for Obese Kids

Weight-loss surgery should be more widely used to treat severely obese children and teens, a leading pediatricians' group says. Severe obesity is a serious and worsening public health crisis among U.S. youngsters, and weight-loss surgery is one of the few effective ways of treating it, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) in its new policy statement, published Oct. 27. "Children with severe obesity develop health problems earlier than those with lesser degrees of obesity, including diabetes, high blood pressure, fatty liver disease, and sleep apnea," said policy statement lead author Dr. Sarah Armstrong, a member of the executive committee of the AAP Section on Obesity. "While lifestyle changes remain the mainstay of treatment, medical care is unlikely to significantly change the trajectory for most children with severe obesity," she said in an academy news release. Current rates of severe obesity are 7.9% in children, 9.7% among 12- to 15-year-olds, and 14% among 16- to 19-year-olds, data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey shows. CONTINUE READING BELOW YOU MIGHT LIKE Recent research suggests that weight-loss surgery is safe and effective in youngsters, but significantly underused, according to the AAP. "The last decade of evidence has shown surgery is safe and effective when performed in high-quality centers, with the primary care pediatrician and family in a shared decision-making process," said Armstrong. "Unfortunately, we see significant disparities in which patients have access to weight-loss surgery. Surgery needs to be an option for all qualifying patients, regardless of race, ethnicity or income," she said.

Severely obese children as young as TWELVE should be offered gastric bypasses 'because it is safe and effective', paediatricians say

Weight loss surgery is normally reserved as a last resort option for severely obese adults who have struggled with their weight for decades. But doctors are now calling for more overweight children to be offered the drastic surgery to tackle the problem early on. ADVERTISEMENT The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says more youngsters - including obese pre-teens - should be put forward for bariatric surgery, which involves shrinking their stomachs to stop them overeating. It made the recommendation based on a review of several studies which showed the treatment to be a safe option. Doctors are calling for more overweight children to be offered weight loss surgery (file image) +2 Doctors are calling for more overweight children to be offered weight loss surgery (file image) They found surgery in teenagers resulted in rapid weight loss which lasted several years and caused diabetes and high blood pressure - side effects of obesity - to vanish. ADVERTISING While most of the studies reviewed looked at teenagers, one included children younger than 12 and found no negative impacts on their growth, the researchers said. RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next

Patients in East Yorkshire need to lose more weight before surgery

Patients in East Yorkshire who need non-urgent surgery will now have to lose even more weight before they can have an operation. East Riding of Yorkshire CCG has lowered the required Body Mass Index (BMI) level from 35 to 30. Obese patients will be given support to reduce their weight over six months before receiving surgery. The Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) said the change was "unfair and ignores clinical guidance". The CCG first introduced its Get Fit for your Operation policy in October 2017. Since then more than 750 people have signed up for the programme with 60% completing the six-month weight loss programme. The scheme also provides support to people to give up smoking. Chair of the CCG Dr Anne Jeffreys said the reduction in the BMI threshold was to "bring the scheme in-line with the national definition of obesity; a person with a BMI of 30 or above". "After a six-month period patients are eligible for referral to surgery irrespective of whether weight has been lost, providing they have been encouraged and supported to access a weight loss service," said Dr Jeffreys. Figures obtained by the BBC in 2017, showed that 62% of CCGs in England were restricting surgery based on patients BMI. A number of other CCGs, including York, Bath and Hertfordshire, have already set a BMI of 30 as the target for patients. Professor Neil Mortensen, vice president of the RCS of England, said although the organisation supported attempts to help people to lose weight it "fiercely oppose blanket restrictions that delay or deny patients' timely access to the operations they need". Prof Mortensen said that the BMI threshold of 30 would exclude surgery to "a good number of the players" in the England World Cup rugby squad. "Such an approach is short-sighted as it can lead to the need for prolonged pain relief medication, impact a patient's quality of life and ability work, and increase the likelihood of them needing social care support," he said.

What do you think of a public transport snack ban?

A ban to stop people snacking on public transport has been mooted by England's outgoing chief medical officer, in a bid to tackle childhood obesity. Has the plan found favour with commuters across the country, or left a bad taste in the mouth? Six out of every 30 children are obese - and it's because they are being "flooded" with junk food, according to Professor Dame Sally Davies. She has suggested a number of measures to tackle the growing crisis, but the one that has sparked the most debate is her proposal to ban snacking on certain public transport. There was a caveat to her proposal: "Prohibit eating and drinking on urban public transport, except fresh water, breastfeeding and for medical conditions." But what do people who have to make these journeys think of the idea? Image caption Maan Surdhar does not think banning snacks on public transport is the answer In Wolverhampton, which is one of the worst places for childhood obesity, Maan Surdhar said a public transport snack ban would not solve the problem. "I think children need to be more active," said the 29-year-old who lives in London and is a postgraduate at the University of Wolverhampton. "In London, people are more aware of their health, children seem to be more active. "But here all I see is children hanging around takeaways, eating all the time and then they go home and there's a real problem with gaming addiction too. "I don't think the answer is banning food on public transport, because even though they might not eat on the bus for example, they'll still eat it outside won't they?" Image caption Rosemary O'Connor said sometimes the bus is the only place she has time to eat a snack Rosemary O'Connor, 61, from Aldersley in Wolverhampton, said: "I don't think they should ban eating on public transport. "I get buses and coaches often and have a snack on them because it's the only time I have sometimes. "It's down to parents - a little and often can do you no harm can it?" Image caption Tony Morgan called the plan "ridiculous" Tony Morgan, 55, who works in security at Wolverhampton railway station branded the plan "ridiculous". "I don't think it would help stop kids being obese," he said. "The main thing is that parents are busy now and so it's easier to pick up a takeaway." Image caption Michelle Crosbie said there were other ways to tackle childhood obesity Michelle Crosbie, who is a public health lecturer for University of Wolverhampton, called for projects to tackle the root of the child obesity problem. "The government has launched various schemes and looked at school dinners, but if you can come out of school and access fast food that's not going to help," she said. "But banning food on public transport may not be the right way to do this. We need to fund grassroots initiatives with families and give children safe and accessible places to play in a way that combines physical exercise and technology. " In Liverpool, Stacey said she agreed with the ban but not for young children. "As a parent you've got to be able to give them a snack - and they can have a healthy snack," she said. "Fast food and hot food yes, it's horrible sitting next to people eating that on the bus. That should not be allowed." Image caption Stacey did not agree with the ban for young children In Nottingham, Sue Walters said: "If you want to change what people eat, you should target the manufacturers, not the end users. "People often don't have the time or information to make better choices but if the products are better, you immediately change what is being consumed." Jo Drage said: "How would you enforce it? Who is going to police it? "Who will judge when someone has to eat and what they can eat?" Image caption Sue Walters said snack manufacturers should be held to account Image caption Jo Drage asked who would enforce the snack ban Commuter Emma O'Riordan posted on Twitter that the idea was "nonsense" and pointed to the need to eat on the run. "I'm currently on a bus for work that left at 06:35 BST so I left the house at 06:25. I'll be damned if anyone is taking my snack from me. "Also, have the authors of this report been around 'hangry' kids? "If you share an hour-long bus trip home with kids after school, would you rather see them have a snack or a meltdown?" Media captionPeople in Manchester give a mixed response to banning snacks on public transport TV presenter Kate Quilton, who fronted Channel 4's Food Unwrapped, said: "The issue is what kids are eating, not when. "Giving my baby a bit of banana on the bus can be a godsend. (A) public transport ban is not the solution." Skip Twitter post by @squeejay Emma O'Riordan @squeejay What nonsense! I'm currently on a bus for work that left at 0635 so I left the house at 0625. I'll be damned if anyone is taking my snack from me! BBC News - Obesity: Ban snacking on public transport, top doctor says https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-49975720 … Boy eating sandwich on train 'Ban snacking on public transport' England's top doctor also wants to see extra taxes placed on unhealthy foods to tackle child obesity. bbc.co.uk 6 6:51 AM - Oct 10, 2019 Twitter Ads info and privacy See Emma O'Riordan's other Tweets Report End of Twitter post by @squeejay A senior conductor with West Midlands Trains told BBC 5 live it was a "ridiculous idea" from a practical standpoint. "I'm just wondering who this nannying nincompoop thinks is going to enforce this? Does she want us to strip search people before they get on the train, or seize the food off them when they start snacking? "I get enough grief just asking somebody to take their feet off the seats, if I tried to take their food off them I'd have a riot on the train." Image caption Anne Terry wasn't entirely convinced the ban was the right approach Some people could see the benefits of the idea, but queried the approach. Anne Terry, in Tunbridge Wells, said: "I can see a ban would be put in for the right reasons, but I'm not sure a blanket ban is the right way to go." Fellow commuter Clive Freeman added: "I think people having hot, smelly foods on the train is more annoying for passengers than eating in general. "If this is about obesity, it would be better if they just said no fizzy drinks or junk food. It's really for the manufacturers to make the food and drink they produce a bit healthier." Image caption Clive Freeman said food manufacturers should improve the healthiness of their products Dr Simon Blainey, an associate professor of transport at the University of Southampton, said it was a "terrible idea" and an "excellent way to discourage people from travelling by healthy and sustainable modes". Mark Ryan, a commuter in central London, said: "I think it's a sensible idea to ban snacking on the Tube but I don't think it will really help with cutting obesity. "The problem is our fast food culture, that's what needs to change. I also don't see how they would be able to police it." Health Secretary Matt Hancock said his department would study the report closely and "act on the evidence". A Department for Health spokesman said there were no plans to ban snacking on public transport.

Call for better routes home from school to tackle childhood obesity

A report says the routes children take between their homes and schools should be free of junk food outlets Photo: PA The routes children take between their homes and schools should be free of junk food outlets and advertising to tackle childhood obesity, according to a report. Unhealthy fast food outlets should be banned from within a five-minute walk of the school gates and cycling and walking routes radically upgraded to help rather than hinder children’s health, the Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) said. It has also called for the banning of app-based food delivery services to school gates, signage to better quality parks, and the scrapping of “burdensome” regulations on lighting for zebra crossings to allow more “European-style” crossings to be painted on streets at low cost. Junk food adverts should be limited in reach, including the banning of advertising of unhealthy food products across all council-owned advertising sites, the Routing Out Childhood Obesity report recommends. Sorry, this content isn't available on your device. Very few would argue with the idea that the routes children follow from school to home should promote health rather than hinder it Kieron Boyle, of Guy’s and St Thomas’ Charity A survey by the charity found 80% of the public would like an end to discounts offered to pupils by unhealthy fast food outlets near schools, while 65% back a ban on new unhealthy fast food outlets within a five-minute walk of the gates, and 68% agree that junk food campaigns across council-owned advertising boards should be banned. The RSPH said its recommendations were based on research done in partnership with urban health foundation Guy’s and St Thomas’ Charity, which included mapping the street environments of Lambeth and Southwark to gauge their impact on childhood obesity, as well as interviews and focus groups with school children from the boroughs. RSPH chief executive Shirley Cramer said: “When the bells ring at the end of the day, a typical school child finds themselves in a situation they would otherwise rarely experience: With time to spare, friends to follow, change in their pocket, no adult direction, and a junk food offer within minutes on foot. “It’s small wonder that, in this environment, junk food outlets have become one of the most popular after-school destinations. Sorry, this content isn't available on your device. Councils are playing their part, but need stronger planning powers to help deal with this epidemic Ian Hudspeth, LGA “Our work with Guy’s and St Thomas’ Charity has shown that if we are to give young people in the UK the options they deserve, and not settle for the cheap and unhealthy offer they are currently restricted to, we need a radical revamp of the street environment surrounding our schools.” Kieron Boyle, chief executive of Guy’s and St Thomas’ Charity, said: “Our joint research with RSPH points to opportunities to transform an important window in the day, when children and teenagers travel home from school. “It shows practical ways to expand the flow of healthy, affordable food options and opportunities to run and play. Very few would argue with the idea that the routes children follow from school to home should promote health rather than hinder it.” Ian Hudspeth, chairman of the Local Government Association’s Community Wellbeing Board, said: “We urgently need to take action to tackle childhood obesity and councils are playing their part, but need stronger planning powers to help deal with this epidemic. “The majority of councils have adopted policies designed to set curbs on fast food outlets, but current legislation means they lack planning powers to tackle the clustering of existing takeaways already open. “Extra powers would also help them to control junk food advertising near schools, nurseries and children’s centres to beat the child obesity crisis, across all billboards, along with a strengthening of advertising standards.”

Health boards get £1.7m to cut child obesity

Health boards in Scotland are to be given a share of £1.7m to help them cut childhood obesity levels. The Scottish government cash is part of a plan to halve the number of overweight under-18s by 2030. The money will go towards ensuring equal access to services across the country. It is a reaction to growing inequality in the levels of obesity between children in the wealthiest and poorest areas of Scotland. The government believes the investment will help health boards meet new standards set by NHS Health Scotland. Weight management It has said it wants to ensure that children in all areas have equal access to help in achieving a healthy lifestyle. Public health minister Joe FitzPatrick said: "We want children and families to have access to the appropriate support to achieve as healthy a weight as possible, no matter where they live. "We are committed to supporting local partners across health and local government to develop ambitious and effective plans to prevent and reduce childhood obesity. Weight management services will be a vital component of effective action." Aim to cut Scots child obesity by half before 2030 More Scots are obese than smoke says Cancer Research UK Obesity 'to be linked to more female cancers' than smoking Suzanne Connolly, senior health improvement officer at NHS Health Scotland, said: "We all have a responsibility to work together to help people in Scotland to achieve and maintain a healthy weight. "There is growing inequality in the prevalence of obesity between children in our wealthiest and poorest areas, and we have to address it." Image copyrightWORLD OBESITY FEDERATION Image caption The Scottish government wants equal access to weight management services in all areas She added: "The standards published by NHS Health Scotland are designed to ensure that all children and young people in Scotland will receive the same high-quality weight management support, informed by the best evidence available and good practice." The funding announcement comes just days after Cancer Research UK revealed that there were nearly 50% more obese people in Scotland than smokers. It said smoking was the biggest preventable cause of the disease but obesity was the leading cause of four types of cancer. The charity launched a new UK-wide campaign to raise awareness of the links between obesity and cancer and called on ministers to restrict junk food multi-buy price promotions. Analysis of official figures by Cancer Research UK (CRUK) estimates there are around 1,270,000 obese adults in Scotland - 29% of the adult population. It says that is almost 50% more than the number of smokers living north of the border (798,000).

Obesity We look at how the proportion of the population who are overweight and obese has changed over tim

Obesity is a major public health problem, both internationally and within the UK. Being overweight or obese is associated with an increased risk of a number of common diseases and causes of premature death, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers. The risk of poor health is strongly correlated with body mass index (BMI). Childhood obesity is associated with various health conditions, including asthma, early onset type-2 diabetes, and cardiovascular risk factors. Children who are obese are also more likely to suffer from mental health and behavioural problems. In addition, being an obese child can have long-term health consequences, as childhood obesity is a strong predictor of adult obesity. In 2016, government launched Childhood obesity: a plan for action which set out a number of actions primarily focused on reducing sugar consumption and increasing physical activity among children. In June 2018, an update to the action plan was published, setting a national ambition to "halve childhood obesity and reduce the gap in obesity between children from the most and least deprived areas by 2030". How has the proportion of adults who are overweight and obese changed over time? 26/02/2019 Chart • QualityWatch Proportion of adults aged 16 and over Underweight Normal Overweight Obese 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% © Nuffield Trust and Health Foundation Source: NHS Digital, Health Survey for England 2017 Share Read more Share Get URL Embed Copy Flip The Health Survey for England collects height and weight measurements from a representative sample of the general population, which are used to calculate body mass index (BMI) statistics. This measure allows us to estimate the proportion of the population who are overweight (BMI ≥25kg/m2 to <30kg 2)="" or="" obese="" (≥30kg/m2).="" this="" indicator="" shows="" trends="" in="" obesity="" and="" overweight="" in="" adults="" from="" 1993="" to="" 2017.="" the="" prevalence="" of="" obesity="" increased="" sharply="" between="" 1993="" and="" 2000,="" with="" a="" slower="" rate="" of="" increase="" after="" that.="" in="" 2017,="" rates="" of="" obesity="" and="" overweight="" increased="" slightly;="" 36%="" of="" the="" adult="" population="" were="" overweight="" and="" 29%="" were="" obese.="" comparing="" men="" and="" women,="" 30%="" of="" all="" adult="" women="" were="" obese="" and="" 31%="" were="" overweight="" compared="" with="" 27%="" of="" men="" who="" were="" obese="" and="" 40%="" who="" were="" overweight="" in="" 2017="" (data="" not="" shown).="" how="" has="" the="" proportion="" of="" children="" aged="" 4-5="" years="" who="" are="" overweight="" and="" obese="" changed="" over="" time?="" 26/02/2019="" chart="" •="" qualitywatch="" proportion="" of="" children="" aged="" 4-5="" years="" underweight="" healthy="" weight="" overweight="" obese="" 2006/07="" 2007/08="" 2008/09="" 2009/10="" 2010/11="" 2011/12="" 2012/13="" 2013/14="" 2014/15="" 2015/16="" 2016/17="" 2017/18="" 0%="" 20%="" 40%="" 60%="" 80%="" 100%="" ©="" nuffield="" trust="" and="" health="" foundation="" source:="" nhs="" digital,="" national="" childhood="" measurement="" programme,="" england="" share="" read="" more="" share="" get="" url="" embed="" copy="" flip="" the="" national="" childhood="" measurement="" programme="" (ncmp)="" collects="" height="" and="" weight="" measurements="" of="" over="" million="" children="" in="" reception="" (aged="" 4-5="" years)="" and="" year="" 6="" (aged="" 10-11="" years)="" in="" state="" schools="" in="" england.="" overall,="" the="" proportion="" of="" children="" in="" reception="" (aged="" 4-5="" years)="" who="" were="" obese,="" overweight,="" healthy="" weight,="" or="" underweight="" has="" remained="" relatively="" unchanged="" since="" 2006/07.="" in="" 2017/18,="" approximately="" 12.8%="" of="" children="" aged="" 4-5="" years="" were="" overweight="" and="" 9.5%="" were="" obese.="" how="" has="" the="" proportion="" of="" children="" aged="" 10-11="" years="" who="" are="" overweight="" and="" obese="" changed="" over="" time?="" 26/02/2019="" chart="" •="" qualitywatch="" proportion="" of="" children="" aged="" 10-11="" years="" underweight="" healthy="" weight="" overweight="" obese="" 2006/07="" 2007/08="" 2008/09="" 2009/10="" 2010/11="" 2011/12="" 2012/13="" 2013/14="" 2014/15="" 2015/16="" 2016/17="" 2017/18="" 0%="" 20%="" 40%="" 60%="" 80%="" 100%="" ©="" nuffield="" trust="" and="" health="" foundation="" source:="" nhs="" digital,="" national="" childhood="" measurement="" programme,="" england="" share="" read="" more="" share="" get="" url="" embed="" copy="" flip="" in="" five="" children="" in="" year="" 6="" (aged="" 10-11="" years)="" were="" obese="" in="" 2017/18="" (20.1%).="" this="" is="" more="" than="" double="" the="" proportion="" of="" children="" in="" reception="" who="" were="" obese="" (9.5%).="" obesity="" in="" children="" aged="" 10-11="" has="" increased="" by="" 2.6="" percentage="" points="" since="" 2006/07.="" the="" proportion="" of="" children="" who="" were="" overweight="" or="" underweight="" has="" remained="" relatively="" stable="" over="" this="" time="" period.="" how="" does="" the="" prevalence="" of="" obesity="" in="" children="" vary="" by="" deprivation?="" 26/02/2019="" chart="" •="" qualitywatch="" index="" of="" multiple="" deprivation="" (imd)="" decile="" (based="" the="" postcode="" of="" the="" child)="" prevalence="" of="" obesity="" in="" children,england="" reception="" (4-5-year-olds)="" year="" 6="" (10-11-year-olds)="" 1(most="" deprived)="" 2="" 3="" 4="" 5="" 6="" 7="" 8="" 9="" 10(least="" deprived)="" 0%="" 10%="" 20%="" 30%="" ©="" nuffield="" trust="" and="" health="" foundation="" share="" read="" more="" share="" get="" url="" embed="" copy="" flip="" there="" is="" a="" strong="" association="" between="" deprivation="" and="" obesity.="" in="" 2017/18,="" in="" both="" reception="" and="" year="" 6="" children="" obesity="" prevalence="" was="" over="" twice="" as="" high="" in="" the="" most="" deprived="" areas="" than="" the="" least="" deprived="" areas.="" severe="" obesity="" prevalence="" was="" about="" four="" times="" as="" high="" in="" the="" most="" deprived="" areas="" than="" the="" least="" deprived="" areas="" (data="" not="" shown).="" about="" this="" data="" this="" indicator="" story="" presents="" findings="" the="" prevalence="" of="" overweight="" and="" obesity="" for="" adults="" from="" the="" health="" survey="" for="" england="" and="" for="" children="" from="" the="" national="" child="" measurement="" programme.="" the="" health="" survey="" for="" england="" (hse)="" consists="" of="" an="" interview="" at="" which="" height="" and="" weight="" are="" measured.="" this="" enables="" the="" calculation="" of="" body="" mass="" index="" (bmi),="" defined="" as="" weight="" in="" kilograms="" divided="" by="" the="" height="" in="" metres="" squared="" (kg/m2),="" a="" measurement="" which="" is="" used="" to="" define="" overweight="" or="" obesity.="" adults="" were="" classified="" into="" the="" following="" bmi="" groups="" according="" to="" the="" world="" health="" organisation="" (who)="" bmi="" classification:="" underweight="" -="" less="" than="" 18.5kg/m2="" normal="" -="" 18.5="" to="" less="" than="" 25kg/m2="" overweight,="" not="" obese="" -="" 25="" to="" less="" than="" 30kg/m2="" obese,="" including="" morbidly="" obese="" -="" 30kg/m2="" or="" more="" morbidly="" obese="" -="" 40kg/m2="" or="" more="" hse="" data="" up="" to="" and="" including="" 2002="" are="" unweighted,="" and="" from="" 2003="" data="" have="" been="" weighted="" for="" non-response.="" for="" more="" information,="" see="" health="" survey="" for="" england,="" 2017:="" adult="" and="" child="" overweight="" and="" obesity.="" the="" national="" childhood="" measurement="" programme="" (ncmp)="" was="" introduced="" in="" 2005/06="" and="" collects="" height="" and="" weight="" measurements="" of="" children="" in="" reception="" (aged="" 4-5="" years)="" and="" year="" 6="" (aged="" 10-11="" years)="" in="" state="" schools="" in="" england.="" the="" programme="" now="" holds="" twelve="" years="" of="" data="" and="" annually="" measures="" over="" million="" children.="" the="" national="" participation="" rate="" has="" increased="" from="" 80%="" in="" 2006/07="" to="" 95%="" in="" 2017/18.="" the="" hse="" also="" collects="" data="" childhood="" obesity,="" however="" as="" it="" is="" a="" sample="" the="" estimates="" are="" less="" precise="" than="" those="" for="" ncmp.="" the="" bmi="" classification="" of="" each="" child="" is="" derived="" by="" calculating="" the="" child's="" bmi="" centile="" and="" classifying="" according="" to="" age="" and="" sex="" to="" take="" into="" account="" different="" growth="" patterns="" in="" boys="" and="" girls.="" the="" ncmp="" uses="" the="" british="" 1990="" growth="" reference="" (uk90)="" to="" define="" bmi="" classifications.="" deprivation="" was="" defined="" by="" the="" deprivation="" decile="" of="" the="" local="" super="" output="" area="" in="" which="" the="" child="" lives.="" it="" is="" likely="" that="" year="" 6="" obesity="" prevalence="" in="" the="" first="" years="" of="" the="" ncmp="" (2006/07="" to="" 2008/09)="" were="" underestimates="" due="" to="" low="" participation.="" this,="" and="" the="" impact="" of="" other="" improvements="" in="" data="" quality,="" should="" be="" considered="" when="" making="" comparisons="" over="" time.="" for="" further="" information,="" see="" the="" national="" child="" measurement="" programme="" -="" england,="" 2017-18:="" appendices.="" comments="" share="" this="" page="" copy="" url="" embed="" sign="" up="" to="" our="" weekly="" newsletter="" email="" address="" email="" address="">

Super-SIZE XXXL school uniforms on sale as High Street reacts to child obesity

Super-sized school uniforms are being sold by high street stores to cope with the UK’s spiralling child obesity crisis. Trousers and skirts for children with 48in waists are being snapped up by parents of heavyweight kids. PROMOTED STORY Why are so many men switching to BIC Shave Club? Why are so many men switching to BIC Shave Club? (BIC SHAVE CLUB) Some plus-size ranges go up to XXXXL – the equivalent of an adult size 26. Doctors warn that carrying weight around the middle of the body is one of the biggest threats to health A 48in skirt on sale for teenage girls is more than 10in wider than the average adult man’s waist – which is around 37in. The average waist size for a 16-year old should be around 26in. Doctors warn that carrying weight around the middle of the body is one of the biggest threats to health. Last year popular store H&M launched a Generous Fit line for children with waist bands going up to 35.5in They said it can increase the risk of developing conditions such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes and cancer. Last year popular store H&M launched a Generous Fit line for children with waist bands going up to 35.5in. It joined a number of other leading retailers, including Next, Tesco and Marks & Spencer, offering plus-sized clothing for children. Ranges by Tesco and Next cater to overweight children as young as three. Figures released last year revealed that half the population is expected to be obese by 2045. Figures released last year revealed that half the population is expected to be obese by 2045. And statistics showed hospital doctors are seeing record numbers of youngsters who were dangerously fat. They said more than 200 children and young people are treated every week for being overweight. The figure, from NHS Digital, has almost tripled since 2009 and is rising by about 15% every year. Ailments youngsters are suffering from include: sleep disorders, stomach aches, breathing issues and joint problems. Ailments youngsters suffered from included sleep disorders, stomach aches, breathing issues and joint problems. All the conditions could have been triggered by their weight problems. Tam Fry, from the National Obesity Forum, described Britain’s worsening childhood obesity epidemic as “a crisis”. He said: “It is truly sickening that children are allowed to become so fat but little is being done to prevent it.”

Back-To-School Body Shaming

It’s back-to-school time, which means that while I begin my self-imposed ban from office supply stores and try to avoid all the parents behaving badly, there is something much more insidious happening. (And I don’t mean the fact that Betsy DeVos bought her way into our public schools.) I’m talking about how some schools are busy trying to instill body shame and possibly triggering eating disorders in their students. Katie Dickens recently found this out the hard way. Like all Georgia parents of first-time public school children, she filled out Form 3300. The form asks questions in four different categories: Hearing, Vision, Dental, and Nutrition. The Hearing, Vision, and Dental categories ask questions pertaining to hearing, vision, and dental health. The “Nutrition” category asks only for weight, height, and the ratio between the two (also known as BMI). Dickens was shocked to receive a letter back stating that, because of her weight as reported on the form, her child was required to schedule a follow-up visit with her pediatrician and provide documentation of it to the school. Besides the fact that any form that considers “nutrition” and “weight” the same thing betrays a complete lack of knowledge of both, and besides the fact that the percentages of what constitutes a “healthy weight” for kids are more or less arbitrary, we have the fact that schools are severely underfunded and have a difficult enough time fitting in actual learning alongside all testing preparation for students. So maybe they could keep their eye on the ball here instead of treading where they absolutely do not belong. It’s called a BMI report card, and it can be made even worse if kids are forced to be weighed in front of their classmates. In some cases, the gym teacher calls out their weight for everyone to hear. Dickens said: "Yeah, I don’t need her to have a stigma already in the fact that she’s already nervous about starting school. It’s like a whole new world, you know that, we’ve all been to kindergarten. You’re scared to death, but you’re excited at the same time. The last thing I need is for my child to be worried about what she weighs at five years old… And [she] is actually above the criteria for her height.” It’s not just at the beginning of the school year, and it’s not just Form 3300. In other schools, it’s done in the middle of the year, and it’s called a BMI report card. This can be made even worse if kids are forced to be weighed in front of their classmates with, in some cases, the gym teacher calling out their weight for everyone to hear. You’re probably asking yourself who in the Sam Hill could possibly think this is a good idea, and that’s an excellent question. Driven by the utterly ill-advised “war on obesity,” more and more school districts and even state and national government programs are insisting that we focus on the weight of children rather than their actual health. These programs fail on every level. They fail to acknowledge not just a natural diversity of body sizes and body compositions, but also natural fluctuations in kids’ weight. If a kid gets their BMI report card taken when they’ve put on weight before a growth spurt, and their parents take them to a doctor who puts them on a diet and restricts their calories, how does that affect that child's growth and health? How are kids supposed to learn to listen to and honor their bodies' hunger signals when we’re putting them on diets in elementary school? How are kids going to have any chance to develop a lifelong love of movement when we teach them that exercise is either punishment for having a body that is “too big” or something to be done in order to keep kids from looking like their larger classmates? How do we keep our kids from growing up into pathetic Reddit trolls when our schools teach them that some bodies are good bodies and some are not? Worse, since intentional weight loss almost never works, some of these programs are using other measures of “success,” one of which is an INCREASE in kids who are indicating that they are concerned about their weight. Just to be clear, they are suggesting that creating a preoccupation with weight is a good thing for kids. There is, as you might expect, no research to support the idea that any of this will make kids thinner or healthier (which are, of course, two different things). In fact, research from the University of Minnesota notes: “None of the behaviors being used by adolescents (in 1999) for weight-control purposes predicted weight loss[ in 2006]… Of greater concern were the negative outcomes associated with dieting and the use of unhealthful weight-control behaviors.” And we live in a world where one out of four children has dieted prior to turning seven, and a staggering 80% of American girls aged ten have been on diets. So kids don’t need any more help being thin-obsessed. This isn’t an insignificant matter; it can be a matter of life and death. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, in the last decade hospitalizations for eating disorders for kids under 12 are up 119%. Kids. Under. Twelve. So, what can you do? Call your kid’s school and see if they do anything like this. If they do, ask what it takes to opt out — can you send a letter? Get a note from your doctor? Claim a religious exemption? Then do it, whatever it takes. Figure out who created this policy, get other parents together, and get some activism going.

Children need a healthy, balanced diet that gives them enough energy to grow and develop. But if they regularly take in more energy (calories) than they need, and don’t do enough physical exercise, they’ll put on too much weight. Children who are very overweight and have too much fat in their body are classed as being obese. If your child is obese, they’re more likely to develop serious health problems later in life, such as diabetes, heart problems and even cancer. An image showing a little girl lying in the grass Is my child obese? Children are all different shapes and sizes. Boys are different to girls and your child will grow and develop at their own rate. This constant change and variation can make it hard to know if your child is a healthy weight. Dr Edward Gaynor, Paediatrician and Clinical Fellow at Bupa UK says: “It’s not always easy to know if your child is a healthy weight – especially if they are quite young. However, your child may be at risk of being overweight if you notice any of the following: they regularly eat the same size food portions as yourself or an older sibling they wear clothes made for older children because they fit better they struggle to keep up with their friends when playing Your child may be completely healthy, but if you’re concerned about their weight or think they could be at risk of being overweight, take them to see the GP. They’ll be able to confirm if your child is the correct weight for their age, height and gender.” How the GP works out if your child is a healthy weight Your GP or health visitor will use a calculation to work out your child’s body mass index (BMI) – this calculation is based on their height and weight. For adults, BMI falls within specific ranges, which indicate whether you are, for example, overweight, underweight or a healthy weight. You can find out more about these reference values on our healthy weight for adults page. But because children are still growing and their height, weight and body fat change a lot, these reference values can’t be used. Instead, specialists collect data on weight, height and age for a large number of children and use this as a reference to develop charts, called BMI centile charts. These can then show whether children are under or overweight for their age by comparing their BMI against other children of the same age and gender. Your GP or health visitor is likely to be concerned if your child’s BMI is in the top 15% of BMIs collected for children their own age and gender. Children are seen as overweight if their BMI is equal to, or above the top 9% of BMIs collected: Your child is obese if their BMI is in the top 2%. Your GP or health visitor will use these charts to assess your child and check for other health conditions related to being overweight or obese. If they think there’s an issue with your child’s weight, they’ll ask about their diet and how active they are. They may also ask about any problems they have that may be caused by their weight, such as physical difficulties, teasing or bullying. Worried about your BMI? Get a picture of your current health and potential future health risks with one of our health assessments. Find out more today. Find out more about health assessments > To book or to make an enquiry, call us on 0345 600 3458^ Worried about your BMI? Find out more about health assessments > Lifestyle changes The best way to tackle obesity in children (and adults) is to make lifestyle changes. If your child is seriously overweight or obese, they’ve been taking in more calories than they’re using up. You’ll need to make changes to their daily routine – the foods they eat and the amount of activity they do. Think about changes you can make as a family to adopt healthier eating habits and become more active. Working together with your child or as a family is likely to be more successful long term as it will help you all make permanent changes to your lifestyle. It’s also important for you to be a good role model. Children are very good at copying adults and if they see you eating well and exercising more, they’re more likely to join in. To encourage your children, try setting goals and giving rewards and praise when they meet them. Choose smaller goals to start with, so that they can achieve them reasonably easily and are encouraged to carry on. Remember not to make rewards food-based though. Food and drink Your doctor may ask you to keep a diary of your child’s food and drink. A diary can help you to see exactly what they are eating. In turn, this can help you to see where to make changes. Don’t forget to include snacks. Here are some tips to help your family eat more healthily. Increase the amounts of vegetables, fruits and grains in your diet and cut down on fatty, salty and sugary foods. Cut out sugary drinks altogether – offer water, semi-skimmed milk drinks (for over fives) or diluted fruit juice in moderation. Add extra vegetables, beans or lentils to soups, stews, casseroles and pasta sauces. If you’re meat eaters, choose more chicken and fish and less red and processed meat. Serve smaller portions and check packaging for number of recommended servings. Using smaller plates may help – dinner plates we use today are much bigger than they were 20 or 30 years ago. If you have a toddler, find out more about how much your toddler should be eating. Sit down to eat as a family as often as you can and involve children in planning and preparing meals. You can set a good example and they can learn about healthy eating. Dr Edward Gaynor, Paediatrician and Clinical Fellow at Bupa UK says: “It’s important not to put your child on a diet that might affect the amount of nutrients and energy (calories) they need to develop and grow. Helping them to have a healthy, balanced diet and do enough physical activity is the safest way to help your child achieve or maintain a healthy weight” Physical activity Children over the age of five need to do at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity every day. This can be all in one go or over a number of sessions of 10 minutes or more. Here are some tips to help your child get active. Try building activity into everyday life, such as walking or cycling to school and using stairs instead of the lift. Involve your children in family jobs, such as walking the dog, washing the car or some gardening. Encourage your child to join classes or clubs for activities they enjoy, such as dancing, swimming or football. Take part as a family: in walking, cycling, dancing or playing sports. Cut down on the amount of time your child spends watching television or using a computer. Try to limit this to less than two hours a day or 14 hours a week. Make sure your child gets enough sleep – increasing physical exercise can help with this. Did you know that school-aged children (6–13 years) should get between nine and 11 hours sleep each night? Will my child be referred to a specialist? Making changes to your child’s lifestyle is the most important way to combat obesity. Your GP may refer your child to see a paediatric dietitian, a doctor who specialises in child nutrition and diet. Your child’s dietitian will come up with a plan that's tailored to your child based on their age and BMI. Losing weight isn’t always advisable in children because they are still growing. Your dietitian may suggest that you aim to keep your child’s weight the same. As your child grows taller and their weight stays the same, their BMI will improve. The GP may suggest that you and your child join a local programme to help them reduce weight and increase exercise. These programmes can also help you to learn more about diet and nutrition and to support and motivate your child. Your GP may also suggest that your child see a paediatrician (a doctor who specialises in child health). This may be because they suspect that there’s a medical condition that is helping to cause your child’s weight problems. Or it may be because they have a medical condition that is being caused or made worse by their weight. Can my child have medicines? Medicines for weight loss are not recommended for children under 12. There’s a medicine called orlistat that may help children who are 12 and over to lose weight. It works by stopping fat from your diet being absorbed from the gut. However, it’s used very rarely and can only be prescribed in a specialist clinic. Your doctor will only prescribe orlistat if your child is very obese and has other health problems caused by their weight. Can my child have surgery? Weight-loss surgery for children is very rarely done and never for younger children. Your child’s doctor will only suggest it if you’ve tried everything else and nothing has worked. To be considered for surgery, your child will need to: have been through puberty be very obese have other health problems related to their excess weight Your doctor will discuss your child’s treatment choices with you. What causes obesity in children? There are a number of different things that can cause obesity in children: eating a poor diet, such as large amounts of high-fat and sugary foods, or portion sizes that are too large inactivity, for example, not doing enough exercise and spending too much time watching television or in front of a computer lack of sleep, which can alter hormone levels and increase appetite genetic (inherited) conditions, although these are rare Your lifestyle when you’re pregnant and in early motherhood may also affect your child’s weight. For example, poor diet in pregnancy is linked to obesity in later life, while breastfeeding may reduce the chance of obesity. If you’re obese, your children are also more likely to be obese. This may happen because you share the same eating or activity habits, or a combination of both. For more information, see our FAQ: Your lifestyle and your child’s weight. What complications could my child get? If your child is overweight or obese, they are more likely to develop serious health problems in the future. Your child may be at risk of osteoarthritis, asthma, heart disease and stroke and some cancers, including bowel, breast, womb and prostate cancer. Sometimes, damage happens in childhood, such as the development of flat feet, which can make walking painful. Your child might also be affected by: high blood pressure high cholesterol type 2 diabetes fatty liver disease sleep apnoea Obesity can also affect your child’s emotional and mental health. Your child may have low confidence or self-esteem, which may lead to depression.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), 40% of Americans, over 93 million people are obese. In addition to the obvious negative health effects of obesity, the economic impact is staggering, with annual medical costs associated with obesity climbing to over $190 billion dollars. As a result, the weight loss market is projected to be a $253 billion dollar market by 2024 and there is a slew of innovative products hitting the market to aid in weight loss. One of the latest is the Food Pill Diet. Science fiction has predicted food being compressed into pill form for over 100 years and the team behind Food Pill Diet is well on its way to achieving it. The science behind this patent-pending diet methodology is that if you do not taste your food then you can trick your body into not feeling hungry. They claim that this allows you to be on a low-calorie diet with much less difficulty than if you are constantly battling cravings. Founder, Dan McGuire, serial inventor and entrepreneur, came up with the idea whilst on the Singularity University Global Solution Program (sponsored by Google) where he lived on the NASA Ames Research base in Mountain View along with 90 of the smartest PhDs, engineers, scientists and entrepreneurs to work on solutions to solve climate change. It was here that he hit on an idea which to his mind helps solve the obesity epidemic, rising healthcare costs, and climate change. While in the program, McGuire researched the personal experience of hunger. He noticed that the loss of a sense of taste was repeatedly linked to weight loss. For example, when people get older and start to lose the sense of taste, they consistently start to lose weight; or if someone takes medicine that has a side effect of them losing their sense of taste, they also consistently lose weight. The First Test Case McGuire theorized that if you could get calories into the body without tasting the food then one could mitigate the uncomfortable desire to eat more. Like many scientists, he ended up being his own first test subject due to a rupture of a disc in his back a year earlier. Since the injury, he had gained a great deal of weight and a doctor warned McGuire that he now had high blood pressure, high cholesterol, high triglycerides and was pre-diabetic

CHILDHOOD OBESITY

 

Childhood obesity is a serious problem in the United States putting children and adolescents at risk for poor health. Obesity prevalence among children and adolescents is still too high. For children and adolescents aged 2-19 years1: The prevalence of obesity was 18.5% and affected about 13.7 million children and adolescents. Obesity prevalence was 13.9% among 2- to 5-year-olds, 18.4% among 6- to 11-year-olds, and 20.6% among 12- to 19-year-olds. Childhood obesity is also more common among certain populations. Hispanics (25.8%) and non-Hispanic blacks (22.0%) had higher obesity prevalence than non-Hispanic whites (14.1%). Non-Hispanic Asians (11.0%) had lower obesity prevalence than non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics. 1Read CDC National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) data brief Cdc-pdf[PDF-603KB] Note: Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) at or above the 95th percentile of the CDC sex-specific BMI-for-age growth charts. Top of Page Obesity and Socioeconomic Status [Read the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR)] The prevalence of obesity decreased with increasing level of education of the household head among children and adolescents aged 2-19 years. Obesity prevalence was 18.9% among children and adolescents aged 2-19 years in the lowest income group, 19.9% among those in the middle income group, and 10.9% among those in the highest income group. Obesity prevalence was lower in the highest income group among non-Hispanic Asian and Hispanic boys. Obesity prevalence was lower in the highest income group among non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic Asian, and Hispanic girls. Obesity prevalence did not differ by income among non-Hispanic black girls. Top of Page Prevalence of Childhood Obesity among Young Low-Income WIC Children in the United States, 2014 Obesity disproportionally affects children from low-income families. Through a collaboration with the United States Department of Agriculture, CDC uses data from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Participants and Program Characteristics (WIC PC) to replace data from the Pediatric Nutrition Surveillance System (PedNSS) for obesity surveillance on the prevalence of obesity among young children aged 2 to 4 years from low-income families. [Read the MMWR report] In 2014, 14.5% of the WIC participants aged 2 to 4 years of age had obesity. The prevalence of obesity among young low-income children varied by WIC State Agency ranging from 8.2% in Utah to 20% in Virginia. The prevalence of obesity was higher among Hispanic (17.3%) and American Indian/Alaska Native (18.0%) young children than among those who were non-Hispanic white (12.2%), non-Hispanic black (11.9%), or Asians/Pacific Islander (11.1%). To view these and other indicators related to nutrition, physical activity and obesity, please visit the Data, Trends, and Maps interactive database. There you can search on the basis of a specific location or an indicator. Top of Page Trends of Childhood Obesity among Young Low-Income WIC Children in the United States, 2000-2014 During 2000–2010, the overall prevalence of obesity among young low-income children in WIC increased significantly, from 14.0% in 2000 to 15.5% in 2004 and to 15.9% in 2010; during 2010–2014, the overall prevalence decreased significantly to 14.5%. [Read the MMWR report] Among non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanics, and American Indians/Alaska Natives, the prevalence of obesity among young low-income children increased significantly during 2000–2004, then decreased significantly during 2010–2014. Among Asians/Pacific Islanders, the prevalence decreased significantly during 2000–2010. Among the 54 WIC State Agencies in states and U.S. territories with data for 2000 and 2004, the prevalence of obesity increased in 48 (89%); among these increases, 38 (70%) were statistically significant. Among the 54 WIC State Agencies with data for 2004 and 2010, the prevalence of obesity increased in 26 (48%), including 17 (31%) that were statistically significant; the prevalence decreased in 27 (37%) State Agencies, including 20 (74%) that were statistically significant. Among the 56 WIC State Agencies with data for 2010 and 2014, only 9 (16%) experienced an increase in obesity prevalence, including 4 (7%) in which the increase was statistically significant. The prevalence of obesity decreased in 45 (80%) State Agencies, including 34 (61%) in which the difference was statistically significant. Top of Page Trends in Weight-for-Length Among Infants in the Women Infants and Children (WIC) Program, 2000-2014 An infant’s relative weight can be measured in several ways, one of which is known as weight-for-length. Infant’s with high level of weight; such as, high body mass index (BMI), weight-for-length, or infants who exhibit rapid growth are at increased risk of subsequent obesity in childhood and early adulthood. Overall, high weight-for-length decreased from 14.5% in 2010 to 12.3% in 2014 among infants aged 3 to 23 months that were enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). Read the publicationExternal. From 2010–2014, 36 states and territories observed a significant decrease in weight-for-length among infants aged 3 to-23 months. For state and territory specific information, please visit the State- and Territory-Specific Changes in the Prevalence of High Weight-for-Length (WFL) Among Infants in the WIC-PC Survey table. High weight-for-length varied across racial/ethnic groups with the 2014 prevalence higher among American Indian (15.6%) and Hispanic (13.8%) infants than among black (11.9%), white (11%), and Asians/Pacific Islander (8.5%) infants. Between 2010–2014, all 20 combinations of race/ethnicity and income showed decreases in the prevalence of high weight-for-length, with the largest decrease among American Indians and Hispanics.

he drive to tackle child obesity has stalled with a raft of measures stuck in Brexit backlog, it is being claimed. A ban on energy drink sales to under-16s, clearer calorie labelling and a crackdown on junk food advertising were all promised by ministers when they launched the revamped obesity strategy. But a year on none of the key measures has been introduced in England. Both Labour and campaigners said it showed progress had stopped - but the government said it was still on track. Among the steps being highlighted by Labour and the Obesity Health Alliance are: banning the sale of energy drinks to children clearer calorie labelling in cafes, restaurants and takeaways a ban on junk food advertising before 21:00 restrictions on price promotions of unhealthy foods, such as "buy one, get one free" tougher standards on catering contracts for schools a voucher scheme for low income families to help them buy healthy food Ministers promised each would be consulted on by the end of 2018. But the government has yet to commit to any of them - with the voucher scheme still to be discussed. Is UK one of the worst child obesity nations? Checkout sweets targeted in obesity fight 'Snail's pace' Caroline Cerny, of the Obesity Health Alliance, acknowledged work had been done despite the "complex political environment", but she added more action was needed quickly if the government was to achieve its target of halving childhood obesity by 2030. "The clock is ticking," she said. Labour's shadow public health minister, Sharon Hodgson, said it represented "snail's pace progress" by a government distracted by the "botched Brexit negotiations". "One year on since the plan was published, the government's so-called commitments to childhood obesity remains mere window dressing," she said. Image copyrightGETTY IMAGES But ministers maintained progress was being made, pointing to the introduction of a tax on sugary drinks as a sign of the government's commitment. The Department of Health and Social Care used the one-year anniversary of the refreshed strategy - the original one was published in 2016, but updated two years later to include clear commitments on action - to trumpet projects that were getting under way in local areas with the help of councils. They include: a partnership in Bradford with local mosques to get the South Asian community active and eating healthier food a drive in Blackburn to get restaurants and takeaways offering healthier foods Lewisham's tactic of using unsold advertising space to promote healthy lifestyle messages Public health minister Seema Kennedy said preventing obesity was at the "heart" of the government's approach. "Every child deserves the best start in life," she added.

Children need a healthy, balanced diet that gives them enough energy to grow and develop. But if they regularly take in more energy (calories) than they need, and don’t do enough physical exercise, they’ll put on too much weight. Children who are very overweight and have too much fat in their body are classed as being obese. If your child is obese, they’re more likely to develop serious health problems later in life, such as diabetes, heart problems and even cancer. An image showing a little girl lying in the grass Is my child obese? Children are all different shapes and sizes. Boys are different to girls and your child will grow and develop at their own rate. This constant change and variation can make it hard to know if your child is a healthy weight. Dr Edward Gaynor, Paediatrician and Clinical Fellow at Bupa UK says: “It’s not always easy to know if your child is a healthy weight – especially if they are quite young. However, your child may be at risk of being overweight if you notice any of the following: they regularly eat the same size food portions as yourself or an older sibling they wear clothes made for older children because they fit better they struggle to keep up with their friends when playing Your child may be completely healthy, but if you’re concerned about their weight or think they could be at risk of being overweight, take them to see the GP. They’ll be able to confirm if your child is the correct weight for their age, height and gender.” How the GP works out if your child is a healthy weight Your GP or health visitor will use a calculation to work out your child’s body mass index (BMI) – this calculation is based on their height and weight. For adults, BMI falls within specific ranges, which indicate whether you are, for example, overweight, underweight or a healthy weight. You can find out more about these reference values on our healthy weight for adults page. But because children are still growing and their height, weight and body fat change a lot, these reference values can’t be used. Instead, specialists collect data on weight, height and age for a large number of children and use this as a reference to develop charts, called BMI centile charts. These can then show whether children are under or overweight for their age by comparing their BMI against other children of the same age and gender. Your GP or health visitor is likely to be concerned if your child’s BMI is in the top 15 percent of BMIs collected for children their own age and gender. Children are seen as overweight if their BMI is equal to, or above the top nine percent of BMIs collected: Your child is obese if their BMI is in the top two percent. Your GP or health visitor will use these charts to assess your child and check for other health conditions related to being overweight or obese. If they think there’s an issue with your child’s weight, they’ll ask about their diet and how active they are. They may also ask about any problems they have that may be caused by their weight, such as physical difficulties, teasing or bullying. Worried about your BMI? Get a picture of your current health and potential future health risks with one of our health assessments. Find out more today. Find out more about health assessments > To book or to make an enquiry, call us on 0345 600 3458^ Worried about your BMI? Find out more about health assessments > Lifestyle changes The best way to tackle obesity in children (and adults) is to make lifestyle changes. If your child is seriously overweight or obese, they’ve been taking in more calories than they’re using up. You’ll need to make changes to their daily routine – the foods they eat and the amount of activity they do. Think about changes you can make as a family to adopt healthier eating habits and become more active. Working together with your child or as a family is likely to be more successful long term as it will help you all make permanent changes to your lifestyle. It’s also important for you to be a good role model. Children are very good at copying adults and if they see you eating well and exercising more, they’re more likely to join in. To encourage your children, try setting goals and giving rewards and praise when they meet them. Choose smaller goals to start with, so that they can achieve them reasonably easily and are encouraged to carry on. Remember not to make rewards food-based though. Food and drink Your doctor may ask you to keep a diary of your child’s food and drink. A diary can help you to see exactly what they are eating. In turn, this can help you to see where to make changes. Don’t forget to include snacks. Here are some tips to help your family eat more healthily. Increase the amounts of vegetables, fruits and grains in your diet and cut down on fatty, salty and sugary foods. Cut out sugary drinks altogether – offer water, semi-skimmed milk drinks (for over fives) or diluted fruit juice in moderation. Add extra vegetables, beans or lentils to soups, stews, casseroles and pasta sauces. If you’re meat eaters, choose more chicken and fish and less red and processed meat. Serve smaller portions and check packaging for number of recommended servings. Using smaller plates may help – dinner plates we use today are much bigger than they were 20 or 30 years ago. If you have a toddler, find out more about how much your toddler should be eating. Sit down to eat as a family as often as you can and involve children in planning and preparing meals. You can set a good example and they can learn about healthy eating. Dr Edward Gaynor, Paediatrician and Clinical Fellow at Bupa UK says: “It’s important not to put your child on a diet that might affect the amount of nutrients and energy (calories) they need to develop and grow. Helping them to have a healthy, balanced diet and do enough physical activity is the safest way to help your child achieve or maintain a healthy weight” Physical activity Children over the age of five need to do at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity every day. This can be all in one go or over a number of sessions of 10 minutes or more. Here are some tips to help your child get active. Try building activity into everyday life, such as walking or cycling to school and using stairs instead of the lift. Involve your children in family jobs, such as walking the dog, washing the car or some gardening. Encourage your child to join classes or clubs for activities they enjoy, such as dancing, swimming or football. Take part as a family: in walking, cycling, dancing or playing sports. Cut down on the amount of time your child spends watching television or using a computer. Try to limit this to less than two hours a day or 14 hours a week. Make sure your child gets enough sleep – increasing physical exercise can help with this. Did you know that school-aged children (6–13 years) should get between nine and 11 hours sleep each night? Will my child be referred to a specialist? Making changes to your child’s lifestyle is the most important way to combat obesity. Your GP may refer your child to see a paediatric dietitian, a doctor who specialises in child nutrition and diet. Your child’s dietitian will come up with a plan that's tailored to your child based on their age and BMI. Losing weight isn’t always advisable in children because they are still growing. Your dietitian may suggest that you aim to keep your child’s weight the same. As your child grows taller and their weight stays the same, their BMI will improve. The GP may suggest that you and your child join a local programme to help them reduce weight and increase exercise. These programmes can also help you to learn more about diet and nutrition and to support and motivate your child. Your GP may also suggest that your child see a paediatrician (a doctor who specialises in child health). This may be because they suspect that there’s a medical condition that is helping to cause your child’s weight problems. Or it may be because they have a medical condition that is being caused or made worse by their weight. Can my child have medicines? Medicines for weight loss are not recommended for children under 12. There’s a medicine called orlistat that may help children who are 12 and over to lose weight. It works by stopping fat from your diet being absorbed from the gut. However, it’s used very rarely and can only be prescribed in a specialist clinic. Your doctor will only prescribe orlistat if your child is very obese and has other health problems caused by their weight. Can my child have surgery? Weight-loss surgery for children is very rarely done and never for younger children. Your child’s doctor will only suggest it if you’ve tried everything else and nothing has worked. To be considered for surgery, your child will need to: have been through puberty be very obese have other health problems related to their excess weight Your doctor will discuss your child’s treatment choices with you. What causes obesity in children? There are a number of different things that can cause obesity in children: eating a poor diet, such as large amounts of high-fat and sugary foods, or portion sizes that are too large inactivity, for example, not doing enough exercise and spending too much time watching television or in front of a computer lack of sleep, which can alter hormone levels and increase appetite genetic (inherited) conditions, although these are rare Your lifestyle when you’re pregnant and in early motherhood may also affect your child’s weight. For example, poor diet in pregnancy is linked to obesity in later life, while breastfeeding may reduce the chance of obesity. If you’re obese, your children are also more likely to be obese. This may happen because you share the same eating or activity habits, or a combination of both. For more information, see our FAQ: Your lifestyle and your child’s weight. What complications could my child get? If your child is overweight or obese, they are more likely to develop serious health problems in the future. Your child may be at risk of osteoarthritis, asthma, heart disease and stroke and some cancers, including bowel, breast, womb and prostate cancer. Sometimes, damage happens in childhood, such as the development of flat feet, which can make walking painful. Your child might also be affected by: high blood pressure high cholesterol type 2 diabetes fatty liver disease sleep apnoea Obesity can also affect your child’s emotional and mental health. Your child may have low confidence or self-esteem, which may lead to

Child Obesity Prevention

Preventing Childhood Obesity

CHILD OBESITY